Wednesday, January 30, 2013

CFBA: Ashton Park

This week, the
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
Ashton Park
Harvest House Publishers (January 1, 2013)
Murray Pura


Murray Pura was born and raised in Manitoba, just north of Minnesota and the Dakotas. He has published several novels and short story collections in Canada, and has been short-listed for a number of awards. His first books to be published in the United States are the inspirational works Rooted and Streams (both by Zondervan in 2010). His first novel to debut in the USA is A Bride’s Flight from Virginia City, Montana (Barbour), which was released January 2012. The second, The Wings of Morning, will be published by Harvest House on February 1. Both of these novels center around the Amish of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.


For fans of the hugely popular Downton Abbey series, comes this equally enthralling story of the Danforth family of Ashton Park. Among the green hills and trees of Lancashire, only a few miles from the sea, lies the beautiful and ancient estate of Ashton Park. The year is 1916. The First World War has engulfed Europe and Sir William's and Lady Elizabeth's three sons are all in uniform--and their four daughters are involved in various pursuits of the heart and soul.

As the head of a strong Church of England family for generations, Sir William insists the Danforth estate hold morning devotions that include both family and staff. However, he is also an MP and away at Westminster in London whenever Parliament is sitting. During his long absences, Lady Elizabeth discreetly spends time in the company of the head cook of the manor, Mrs. Longstaff, who is her best friend and confidante. This friendship includes visits to a small Baptist church in Liverpool that exposes Lady Elizabeth to a less formal approach to Christian worship and preaching than she is used to and which she comes to enjoy.

If you would like to read the first chapter of Ashton Park, go HERE.

I'm sorry to say that I didn't really enjoy this book.  I felt that way too many characters were introduced too soon.  I couldn't keep up or make sense of them which made it difficult to follow through the rest of the book.  Add the abundance of characters to the quickly changing scenes and you end up feeling a bit dizzy!

While this could have been a wonderful book, if perhaps everything took it's time and developed a bit better, it just wasn't for me, some of the plots, characters were a bit cliche as well.

That being said, the cover was gorgeous!

*I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for review from CFBA


Monday, January 28, 2013

1/29....Last day to save on Tiny Prints Valentines Cards!

Valentines Day Card from Tiny Prints

If you are not familiar with Tiny Prints, these are the best cards you can buy. And you can completely customize with your child's pictures, your own text, and text and fonts that you choose.

If your kids are too young, too old, or non-existent, Tiny Prints also has great customized photo gifts and Valentine's Day party invitations, and their sister company, Treat has some awesome personalized greeting cards. Here are some of the most popular cards. If you order by 11:59pm PT January 29 and use the promo code 20JANSW you can save 20% on your entire order!

Just click HERE or on any of the links and don't forget to use your code! 
Heartfelt Speedway Valentines Cards


Friday, January 25, 2013

CFBA: Grace Given

This week, the
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
Grace Given
Realms (January 8, 2013)
Beth Shriver


Childhood memories of her grandfather's ranch came alive as Beth wrote her first Amish story. Her parents grew up in the country, so she appreciates pastoral life and respects those who make a living off the land. She visits a nearby Amish community just south of Fort-Worth for an occasional church service or brunch with the bishop and his wife. And on the way home she stops at the community store to get some plum jam!

Beth received a degree in social work and psychology from the University of Nebraska. She worked as a caseworker for Boulder County Department of Social Services before starting a family. Beth and her husband, two children, along with two cats and a beagle live in Texas after moving from their first home in Colorado. She freelances for the local papers in her area and writes columns, devotionals for magazines, and novels in a variety of genres in both fiction and nonfiction. Beth is represented by Tamela Hancock Murray of the Steve Laube Literary Agency.


“Never doubt in the darkness what God has shown you in the light.” —Amish Proverb

Elsie Kline can’t forgive her sister for leaving the community. Gideon Lapp helps Elsie through her bitterness by studying the Martyr’s Mirror book that is centuries old, describing their ancestors’ sacrifice for their faith. But he feels there is something more. When the community moved to Texas, they were not welcomed by some of the locals. They have told Katie and Elsie that harm will come to their community if don’t go back up north where they came from. Gideon stays by Elsie’s side as she learns to give grace and to humble herself to accept grace as well. “Beth has a heart for helping others, whether through her nonfiction and fiction writing or in other capacities. It has been my pleasure to read and respond to her work during the past few years of knowing her.” —Leanna Ellis, Author of Facelift and Forsaken and winner of the National Readers Choice Award.

If you would like to read the first chapter of Grace Given, go HERE.

*I am posting on behalf of CFBA, I have not yet received this book for review.


Thursday, January 24, 2013

Tiny Prints.....Are you ready for Valentine's Day?

So have you picked out that special Valentine's Day card for that special someone yet? If you have not (or if the one you picked out isn't all that special), I've got a tip for you. Visit Treat and make a personalized Valentine's Day card, so much better than your every day card that everyone else had picked out!  Be original!!!

Valentines Day Greeting Cards from Treat

Here are some of their most popular cards for him and her.

For Him
Bee My Love Valentine Cards
Bee My Love

Plenty of Passion Valentine Cards
Plenty of Passion

Sublime Shapes Valentine Cards
Sublime Shapes

For Her

Surrounding Hearts Valentine Cards
Surrounding Hearts
Beloved Beauty Valentine Cards
Beloved Beauty
Delicious Dessert Valentine Cards
Delicious Desserts
Also, if you need cards for your kids' classroom, check out their sister site, Tiny Prints, for the best classroom Valentines! If you do so by January 30 and use the promo code 20JANSW you can save 20% on your entire order!

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

CFBA Book Review: Mystery of the Heart

This week, the
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
Mystery of the Heart
Realms (January 8, 2013)
Jillian Kent


Jillian Kent is a busy writer and the alter ego of Jill Nutter, a full-time counselor.

Jill spent the first semester of her senior year of college at Oxford studying British Literature, where she fell in love with England. During this season, she came to appreciate the written word, the rich imagery of romantic poetry like The Highwayman, and historical novels of many types, including Jane Austen and all things Regency.

Jill received her Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from Bethany College in West Virginia, and her Masters Degree in Social Work from WVU, and she brings her fascination with different cultures and societies into her writing.

Jill has always been a romantic at heart, so readers will find a good dose of romance woven through each of her novels. Jill, her husband Randy, and children Katie and Meghan are animal lovers. They currently own two dogs, Boo-Boo and Bandit and a menagerie of cats, Lucky, Yuma, Snow, and Holden. Critters of all assortments make their appearance in her stories.


Lord Eden is intrigued when he discovers Lady Mercy Grayson’s secret, but how can he hope to gain her heart when he is forced to betray her?

Lady Mercy Grayson longs be a physician like her big brother, Devlin, Lord Ravensmoore. However, society would never tolerate a female physician, let alone one who is a noblewoman. So Mercy takes matters into her own hands, disguising herself as a man to get through medical school. But then a male colleague discovers her secret, which is only the beginning of Mercy’s problems that could destroy her dreams forever.

The Prince Regent is awaiting the return of Vincent St. Lyons, Lord Eden, whom he sent on a secret voyage to locate and bring back a relic that some believe possesses the power to heal. St. Lyons discovers Mercy washed up on England’s shore upon his return and agrees to give her safe passage to London aboard a ship of men practicing African Vodun. Both must face treacherous circumstances, difficult decisions, and a growing attraction to one another that could forever change the course of their lives.

As the final installment in the series, the theme of this book is God’s plans for our lives. “Whatever the hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might” (Eccles. 9:10).

If you would like to read the first chapter of Mystery of the Heart, go HERE.

WOW...what a fun read.  I'm not sure what I expected but what I got was great!  Princes, Lords, Vodun Kings and Doctors make for a witty fun-filled adventure with a wee bit of romance tucked in for fun.  This was a fast read for me, actually, it kept me up half the night because I HAD to finish it.  There were things to find out, circumstances that needed to be taken care of, how could I sleep and leave the characters hanging?

 If you like a bit of intrigue I think you'll enjoy this book!

*I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for review from CFBA


Friday, January 18, 2013

CFBA Book Review: Path of Freedom

This week, the
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
Path of Freedom
Abingdon Press (January 2013)
Jennifer Hudson Taylor


Jennifer Hudson Taylor is an award winning author of historical Christian fiction set in Europe and the Carolinas and a speaker on topics of faith, writing and publishing. Her debut novel, Highland Blessings, won the 2011 Holt Medallion award for Best First Book. Jennifer's work has appeared in national publications, such as Guideposts, Heritage Quest Magazine, Romantic Times Book Reviews, and The Military Trader. She serves as the in-house Publicist at Hartline Literary Agency and co-owns Upon the Rock Publicist. Jennifer graduated from Elon University with a B.A. in Communications. When she isn't writing, she enjoys spending time with family, long walks, traveling, touring historical sites, hanging out at bookstores with coffee shops, genealogy, and reading.


2nd in the Quilts of Love series

When Quakers Flora Saferight and Bruce Millikan embark on the Underground Railroad, they agree to put their differences aside to save the lives of a pregnant slave couple. With only her mother’s quilt as a secret guide, the foursome follows the stitches through unknown treachery.

As they embark on their perilous journey, they hope and pray that their path is one of promise where love sustains them, courage builds faith, and forgiveness leads to freedom.

If you would like to read the first chapter of Path of Freedom, go HERE.


I had a difficult time reading this book, it's no fault of the author, but instead, just the fact that I don't relate well to the time period and the type of vocabulary used throughout the book.  All of the thee's and thy's threw me off, and made it for a not so comfortable read.

That's not to say I didn't enjoy the story line!

 This book is part of the Quilts of Love series, each book is quite different and they are each stand alone stories that revolve around a quilt.  This is a story line that you don't see too often, it revolves around Quakers and Slaves, seemingly a very odd combination but it mixes together quite well, just as the fragments of a quilt may not seem as though they'll look good until the project has been completed!

You'll find forgiveness in this story, as well as the question, is it ok to sometimes lie?

...and that's all I'm going to give you, you'll just have to read it!

*I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for review from CFBA


Wednesday, January 16, 2013

CFBA Book Review: HURT

This week, the
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
David C. Cook; New edition (January 1, 2013)
Travis Thrasher


After college, he targeted working in the publishing industry and was fortunate to find a job early after graduation. He worked as Author Relations Manager for Tyndale House Publishers, the publisher of his first two novels.

The thirteen years he spent working in author relations taught him the business of publishing as well as the psyche of writers.

Early on, he made a deliberate choice of not wanting to be boxed in by a brand or a genre. Instead, Travis has chosen time and time again to write the stories that mean something to him at that moment. He views his first ten years of being published as training and practice. Those novels in many ways were written for himself.

The four years of writing full time have taught him the discipline and determination necessary to make it as a novelist. They’ve also served to close the chapter on what is hopefully just one era in his writing journey.

The stories continue to fill his head like they did when he was in third grade. The only difference is that Travis now knows what to do with those stories. His goal continues to be to tell stories that move him as well as his readers. He wants to continue to experiment and take risks, but more than anything he wants to provide readers a satisfying experience.

The dream remains the same. To try and write something magnificent. To make up wild worlds full of wonderfully rich characters. To make sense of the world through the stories he tells. And to try and inspire hope with the words he writes.


His Rebellion Will Soon Turn to Hope

When Chris Buckley first encountered the mysteries of creepy Solitary, North Carolina, he had little idea how far he would fall into the town’s shadows. After losing the love of his life, Chris tried to do things his way. He hunted answers. Then he gave up trying to find them.

But now Chris comes back to Solitary knowing there’s a purpose for his being there. As he watches his place in a twisted and evil bloodline become clear, Chris waits for the last battle—and wonders who will be left when he finally makes his stand.

If you would like to read the first chapter of Hurt, go HERE

Doesn't just the title alone make you cringe?  Then you think about the town: Solitary, those two words alone left me feeling as though I'd be in for quite a ride as soon as I began to read this book.

This is book 4 in the series, this book will lure you in, having you turning pages as you're looking over your should and just may keep you up all night reading's that good.  The ending may just surprise, but then again, it may not....I have to keep you hanging in suspense.  A little edgy, a little suspense, good and evil, and a few twists all mixed together create this wonderfully can't wait to finish, fast paced book!

I wouldn't just settle for reading Hurt, because then you'll feel bad that you didn't read the first three, and who wants to go backward in a series?  You might as well just buy them all. 

*I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for review from CFBA


Monday, January 14, 2013

Book Review and Giveaway! Rennefarre

Imagine riding on the back of a blue heron across time and space. Imagine befriending crows, being kidnapped by magpies, and being given a lift on the back of a kindly stag. Imagine experiencing life as an outcast from human society, encountering spirits and mythical creatures from the world of legends, experiencing the plague in Dresden, and being chased through Berlin by Frederick the Great.

Dott is a twelve-year old girl. She lives in the countryside east of Berlin in an unspecified time between the two world wars. When Dott sneaks out to see the bonfire at the edge of her village on the evening of the midsummer night festival, she has no idea what will happen next. In the dark of night, the magical Rennefarre flower falls into her shoe. It not only makes her invisible, but also allows her to see things no one else could see. No longer able to stay with her parents and her young brother and sister, she begins her search to find a way out of her predicament.

Her quest to return home to her family winds its way through the cities and countryside of 20th century Germany—and beyond. As she befriends the local animals, they help her on her way with gifts of food, shelter, and—through the help of a kind spirit—a magical cup which allows her to become small and ride on the backs of the birds.

Flying across the country on the backs of crows and herons, Dott finds herself seeing the country not only as it is, but also as it used to be. She lives through moments in history others can only read about—meeting historical kings and fanciful spirits along the way. But, even with all of the excitement of her travels, she always has one goal in mind: returning home to her family.

Part coming-of-age story, part fantasy, and part social-cultural portrait of Eastern Germany in the early part of the 20th century, the book covers real ground. That is, one could follow Dott's travels on a map of the area. Seamlessly blending elements of fantasy and history, the book contains a fascinating array of details of day-to-day life in rural and urban areas in eastern Germany. Dott’s adventures are interwoven with folklore and myths as well as vivid accounts of different eras and the diverse cultural and ethnic strains that have formed the basis for a rich and complex history of Germany and Eastern Europe. Written on the eve of World War II, the book offers a sobering perspective on the human potential for causing devastation. At the same time it is filled with hope. In one scene, Dott gets a glimpse of the future — an utterly destroyed cityscape; it inspires her to look to her own responsibilities and actions in life.

Details regarding the translation:
Rennefarre: Dott’s Wonderful Travels and Adventures is a translation of a German children’s classic by Tamara Ramsay (Wunderbare Fahrten und Abenteuer der kleinen Dott). Reminiscent of The NeverEnding Story, Nils Holgersson and the Wild Geese, and the Magic Tree House series, the book would be appropriate for children ten years of age and older. The book was first published by Union Deutsche Verlagsgesellschaft, Stuttgart, in 1941. An expanded edition of the book in three volumes appeared after World War II in 1950/1951. An abridged new edition in a single volume appeared in 1965 (Stuttgart: Union Verlag, 1965). Over 25 editions of the book appeared between 1941 and 2008. In 2007, it was published in a new expanded edition in two volumes by Prignitz-Pur Verlag, Germany. The book was translated only once previously, into Dutch in 1986 (De wonderbare avonturen van Kleine Dot, Christofoor, Zeist, 1986). The translated text reflects the German abridged edition of 1965. 

Author Interview:

Please tell us about your current release.
The first English edition of Rennefarre is the culmination of a dream of mine—a perfect storm of things that I love: a wonderful original text, the challenge of translation, the thrill of research, and the joy of assembling everything into a finished product. I am excited that it is now in print and available to an English reading audience.  

Can you tell us about the journey that led you to write your book?
I have loved Rennefarre since I was a child. I read it over and over, fascinated and charmed by the adventures of Dott, the main character—described in such a tangible and immediate fashion. I loved the voices of the animals that Dott encounters. The descriptions and scenes are so real that it is easy to imagine oneself following along in Dott’s footsteps. Dott, impulsive, stubborn, and passionate, was real and believable to me as a child. As an adult returning to this book, I decided that it was a treasure that should be made available to English readers.

Can you tell us about the story behind your book cover?
The cover depicts a scene in the book where Dott seeks out a place to sleep for the night. When she stands in front of this building, she feels very much alone and is grateful for the company of Ardea, the young heron next to her. She ends up sleeping in the abbey, sheltered and kept warm by the heron’s wing.  The image conveys many elements of the story, the thrill of discovery, the charm of nature, a multi-layered and complex history, the importance of friendship, and the feeling of being alone.

What approaches have you taken to marketing your book?
This is a new and exciting experience for me, and the learning curve is sharp.  It is my first venture into making use of Facebook and other social media for marketing. I look forward to discussing details of the book on blogs. I will attend an authors and illustrators event at a school in my town in March 2013.

What book on the market does yours compare to? How is your book different?
This is not an easy question to answer. Two books, also translated, come to mind. One is Michael Ende’s Nevere nding Story. Like Rennefarre, this book involves the element of a quest and the search for home, but unlike Rennefarre, it is set entirely within the world of fantasy. Selma Lagerlöf’s Nils Holgersson and the Wild Geese involves a similar storyline of a child that travels with animals and seeks to return home; however, it was written for a much younger audience. The Magic Tree House series by Mary Pope Osborne has some interesting parallels. These books feature children who are magically transposed into different periods and places in the world as a result of which they are given brief glimpses into history and myths. Meanwhile, the books are addressed to a younger audience and ultimately consist of many disparate fragments or glimpses of the world of history and legends. Rennefarre, perched on the fluid fault lines between history and legend and interwoven with elements of magic and fantasy, meanwhile presents a single story of a child’s journey with an overarching central theme of human responsibility and choices.

What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?
Regrettably, I would have to admit to an unfortunate tendency to writing long convoluted sentences. Even though I have lived in this country since I was thirteen and have worked as a translator for over two decades, the German language has a way of creeping up in my writing.  There is a lovely word in German, “Schachtelsatz”, which describes a sentence consisting of boxes within boxes within boxes of meaning.  The polar opposite is the standard of short succinct sentences favored by many writers, including those trained in American schools of journalism, among others. I try to steer somewhere in the middle of these sirens of style. 

Open your book to a random page and tell us what’s happening.
Page 45: In this scene, Dott tries to fulfill a quest with which she had been entrusted. She wants to free an owl that had been captured by humans in order to serve as a decoy. Dott sits in front of the cage where the owl is being held and waits for daylight. Two other animals, the owl’s mate and a squirrel, are watching and waiting to see how Dott will manage to free the owl. The owl looks sick and apathetic. Dott is appalled by the suffering of this bird in captivity and feels ashamed as a human being.

Do you plan any subsequent books?
I have completed a manuscript of historical fiction for young adults entitled Falconello. It is set in the 13th century and involves the journey of a young man from the north of Germany to Italy.  I am now working on another historical fiction work set in Jerusalem in the 12th century.

Tell us what you’re reading at the moment and what you think of it. 
Aside from rereading Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice whenever I am in the need of balance, I always have a stack of books that I check out of my local library. The latest gem has been a book by Helen Dunmore, The Siege, about the siege of the city of Leningrad in World War II. It is a book hard to forget; the relentless cold and the gnawing hunger seep into your bones as you read it, and at the same time, Dunmore captures something exquisite and beautiful about the human spirit.

Price: $13.99
Pages: 297
ISBN: 9781938690389
Publisher: Two Harbors Press
Release: December 11, 2012
Buy Link:

A beautiful book, a good clean, Christian fantasy perfect for a young adult, or actually, any age at all!  The illustrations are wonderfully done and the characters full of whimsy, yet having a caring attitude about others feelings.  This is a book that will teach lessons and kindness, and Dott is a character that your child, or your own inner child will be able to relate to quite easily.

Want to win an EBOOK Copy?  

Here's what you need to do:
Follow my blog and leave a comment with your email address

Extras: (leave a separate comment for each entry)
+1 tell me who you would share this book with
+2 follow my other blog at
+2 follow me on twitter & tweet about the giveaway (can be done daily) leave tweet link

This giveaway will end on Sunday 1/20 at midnight. Good Luck! 


Saturday, January 12, 2013

Craftsy Quilt Block of the Month

 Block of the Month
Have you heard? The free Craftsy Block of the Month course is back! Join quilting legend, Laura Nownes, in this free online quilt class and learn a new quilt technique each month. By year end, you will have a beautiful quilt sampler and a new toolbox of techniques! Whether you're a beginner or an expert quilter, join the largest online quilt-a-long with Craftsy.
Everyone who signs up for the Craftsy 2013 Block of the Month course by January 31, 2013, will be entered to win a course kit with 11.5 yards of Robert Kaufman fabric, a $100 value. Craftsy will be giving away two of these kits. If a contest winner registers for the class through my link I will also win!

To join just click the banner below:
Online Quilting Class
Key Points:
  • 2012 Block of the Month had over 120,000 students from around the world.
  • It is a free course with a new block released each month.
  • At the end of the year you will have a finished quilt sampler.
  • Learn new quilt techniques each month.
  • Taught by Laura Nownes, author of Quilts! Quilts!! Quilts!!!
  • Missed a month? Starting late? It's okay - access never expires! 

Thursday, January 10, 2013

Book Review: The Lesson

Centered on one of Suzanne Woods Fisher’s most loved characters, this is the story fans have eagerly anticipated. The precocious M.K. is all grown up (well, almost) and ready to take on the world–with surprising results. Fisher’s trademark plot twists and turns are as unexpected and satisfying as ever in this third book in the Stoney Ridge Seasons series.

In her wildest dreams, spunky and impulsive nineteen-year-old Mary Kate Lapp never imagined herself behind a schoolteacher’s desk. A run-in (literally) with the schoolteacher compels her to act as a substitute teacher, just as her restless desire to see the world compels her to apply for a passport . . . just in case. The only thing of interest to M.K. in the sleepy Amish community of Stoney Ridge is the unexplained death of a sheep farmer that coincided with the arrival of a mysterious young man into the community. Frustrated that no one takes the crime seriously, she takes matters into her own hands. Unfortunately, as tends to be the case for M.K., she jumps headlong into trouble.

M.K. is definitely a girl that will give you a laugh, she has a serious side too, if only people would listen to her!

I've followed M.K. through this serious and have fallen in love all over again with The Lesson, full of humor, and a great plot, you'll find yourself not only in M.K's shoes, but those around her as well.  You do not have to read previous books, this is a stand alone story, and M.K.'s story is one you won't want to miss!

*I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for review from Litfuse

Celebrate the release of The Lesson with Suzanne Woods Fisher by entering to win one of TWO iPads!
Two winners will receive:
  • A brand new iPad
  • A $15 gift certificate to iTunes
Enter today by clicking one of the icons below. But hurry, the giveaway ends on January 20th. Winner will be announced on 1/22/13 at Suzanne's Blog.

Tell your friends via FACEBOOK or TWITTER and increase your chances of winning.


Wednesday, January 9, 2013

CFBA Book Review: Doctor to the Rescue

This week, the
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
Doctor To The Rescue
Love Inspired (December 18, 2012)
Cheryl Wyatt


Born Valentine’s Day on a Navy base, Cheryl Wyatt writes military romance. Her Steeple Hill debuts earned RT Top Picks plus #1 and #4 on eHarlequin's Top 10 Most-Blogged-About-Books, lists including NYT Bestsellers. Cheryl loves interacting with her readers and can be found almost daily on Facebook.

Word from the Author:
I do regular giveaways including a Kindle for every 250 people who join (aka "Like) my Facebook author page: and I'd LOVE for word to spread about that. We have a lot of fun there as I ask for frequent reader input on current books, with helpers being mentioned in the acknowledgements and fun stuff like that.


Combat doctor Ian Shupe returns home from overseas with his most important mission: to raise his little girl. But Ian's a single dad, and working at Eagle Point's trauma center means having to find child care. When bighearted, struggling lodge owner Bri Landis offers babysitting in exchange for construction work, Ian accepts. He vows to keep his emotional distance from Bri, yet can't deny that his daughter is blossoming under her tender care. But is he ready to believe that his heart's deepest prayer may finally be answered? If you would like to read the first chapter of Doctor To The Rescue, go HERE.

I have been out of state so have not been home to collect my mail and read this book, as soon as I read it I will add my thoughts!

*I have received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for review from CFBA


Friday, January 4, 2013

Book Review: Flight of the Earls

This week, the
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
Flight of the Earls
B&H Books (January 1, 2013)
Michael Reynolds


Michael K. Reynolds is the writer and producer of Emmy and Telly Award-winning film campaigns and has more than two decades of experience in fiction, journalism, copywriting, and documentary production. He owns Global Studio, a marketing agency, and is also an active leader in church and business, speaking in both ministry and corporate settings. Michael lives with his wife and three children in Reno, Nevada.


It’s 1846 in Ireland. When her family’s small farm is struck by famine, Clare Hanley and her younger brother, Seamus, set out across the ocean to the Promised Land of America. Five years prior, Clare’s older sister Margaret and her Uncle Tomas emigrated in similar fashion and were not to be heard from again. But Clare must face her fears as she lands in the coming-of-age city of New York. There she discovers love, adventure, tragedy, and a terrible secret which threatens to destroy her family and all she believes. Flight of the Earls is the first book in a historical novel trilogy based on Irish immigration in the 1840s.

If you'd like to read the first chapter of Flight of the Earls, go HERE

Flight of the Earls is the first book of the Historical Novel trilogy.

This story captivated me, full of trials, hunger, prayers, betrayal, journey's to the unknown and romance...

I have no Irish heritage what so ever, but found myself feeling every bit Irish as those in the story, this is a series that I am going to follow, this book was the perfect beginning for the New Year! 

*I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for review from CFBA